Kings Road and Dixie Highway via Savannah

Later this month the Embassy Suites Historic Savannah will host an unusual conference in downtown Savannah for all our road warrior friends out there, at least those that have a love of the spur of the moment road trip.  September 26 through the 28th is when this interesting conference is slated to be held.

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The 2014 Preserving the Historic Road Conference, partnered with the National Scenic Byways Foundation, will provide a diverse and comprehensive conference program, which will include enlightening educational sessions, and informative mobile workshops to unique sites (featuring some great shrimp, grits and barbeque). The combination of these events will let you experience southern road culture, history and local issues that tie in to the national, and global, perspective of historic road identification and protection.

As the Preserving the Historic Road Conference literature indicates there are a number of reasons for serious “on the road again” enthusiasts to be in attendance (if for no other reason than to dazzle your friends and fellow travelers with your arcane knowledge of our southern road systems).

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Upon founding Savannah in 1733 General James Oglethorpe organized the now famous squares as military parade grounds among the residences, businesses and churches of the capital city of the 13th Colony. Beyond Savannah, American Indian roads transformed into colonial trade routes, such as the King’s Road, and were later used during the Revolutionary and Civil wars. These same roads evolved into the highways of the modern era, providing the lifeline between growing industries and the bustling Port of Savannah. These same roads further enticed travelers to southern vacationlands via the Dixie Highway and the Atlantic Coastal Highway (US 17). So journey on down with your fellow road enthusiasts and enjoy some fine southern hospitality!

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